How to Make Ginger Tea (Hot, Iced, and for Topical Use)

If you've been wondering how to make ginger tea, you'll find good-for-you ginger tea recipes here. This soothing, spicy tea is incredibly beneficial for wellness, not only when enjoyed as a beverage, but when used in a tea bath or compress, as well. 

American poet and essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson said, "The first wealth is health." However, in today's busy and often stressful world, it can be challenging to make time to nurture our physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual wellness. 

Finding simple but effective ways to support and enhance wellness - such as drinking teas and herbal tisanes - can make such a difference in how we feel and in the quality of our lives, too. 

Whether you prefer your ginger tea hot or iced, are preparing a restorative ginger tea compress, or are looking forward to a relaxing, fragrant ginger tea bath this evening before bedtime, these ginger tea recipes are wonderful ways to practice some self care. 

How to Make Ginger Tea | The Tea Talk

How to Make Ginger Tea

This fresh ginger tea recipe makes 1 - 2 servings of hot tea, but it increases very well. Simply adjust the amounts proportionately to make additional cups or even a pot of aromatic ginger tea.

You'll need...

  • 2 cups fresh, clean water
  • 1 to 2 inch piece of good-quality, young, fresh ginger root
  • Other additions to taste, such as your favorite milk, organic sweetener, or citrus (lemon, lime, or orange slices)

Why not try...

Now that you know how to make ginger tea, why not create your own unique tea blend by adding hibiscus, black, or chamomile loose-leaf tea or teabags to ginger tea? So delicious, and even more wellness benefits. 

To make the tea...

  1. Cut away any spoiled, old, or damaged bits from the ginger, and then rinse the ginger well with fresh, cool water.
  2. Scrape or peel away the skin of the ginger with a spoon or a knife. (Scrape carefully and take just the skin so you don't lose any flavorful ginger - the edge of a spoon's bowl works very well for this.)
  3. Thinly slice the ginger and, if you'd like, smash it a little with a mortar and pestle. You can also grate the ginger, rather than slicing it.
  4. Add the ginger and the water to a saucepan and cover (this helps to retain the ginger's beneficial ingredients). Bring the tea to a boil over high heat.
  5. Lower the heat and simmer the tea gently (still covered) for about 10 minutes. As it simmers, the tea will darken in color and develop a richer flavor.
  6. Strain the tea (or leave in the pieces of ginger, if you'd rather enjoy them with your tea), and pour the steamy liquid into some pretty china cups or your favorite big mug. Touch up your tea, if you'd like, with some milk, sweetener, or a thin slice of orange, lemon, or lime for flavor.

Enjoy your fragrant ginger tea. Inhale deeply to enjoy this tea's aromatherapy benefits, and savor that first delectable sip. 

After making this recipe, you may find that you would prefer more or less ginger flavor in your tea. If so, simply adjust the proportions of water to ginger the next time you make the recipe. You can also add some just-boiled water or some citrus or milk to your freshly made tea if you find the taste too strong. 

| Related:  Making Tea

How to Make Ginger Tea | The Tea Talk

Ginger is such a versatile, beneficial tea! For more about how to make ginger tea, try our recipes for iced ginger teaSalabat, a ginger tea compress, and even a refreshing, detoxifying ginger tea bath

And be sure to drop by our Herbal, Spice, and Fruit Teas Pinterest board for more herbal-tea inspiration. 


Now that you know how to make ginger tea...

Browse through our Ginger Tea Side Effects page, and why not have a chat with your trusted herbal practitioner or healthcare provider about ginger tea for you and your family (as a beverage or used topically). 

We have so many beautiful teas and herbal tisanes available to us nowadays in loose-leaf or bagged varieties, but making fresh ginger tea from scratch is a rewarding and delicious alternative.

Once you've tried this home-made ginger tea recipe, you'll likely find yourself keeping some ginger root on hand so you can enjoy ginger tea (and its many wellness benefits) whenever you want.

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