Some Chamomile Tea Side Effects, Precautions, and Safe-Use Tips

Before steeping a pot of this delicious brew, be sure to take some time to get to know more about potential chamomile tea side effects, precautions, and tips for safe use. 

Once we begin to discover herbal teas (like chamomile), a whole new world of amazing flavors, aromas, and wellness benefits opens up to us. These incredible beverages have been much-loved for centuries, not only as delicious drinks, but also for the many ways they can help and support us. 

Chamomile Tea Side Effects | The Tea Talk

Still, as herbal teas do contain active ingredients, not every herbal tea may be the best choice for each of us. Before adding any tea to your (or your family's) tea routine, be sure to get to know more about that tea - not only its benefits for well-being, but also any associated concerns or precautions. 

Here are some things to keep in mind about chamomile tea (not only as a beverage, but also for using this tea topically). 

Some General Precautions about Chamomile Tea Side Effects

One of our favorite herbal tisanes around the world, chamomile tea can be beneficial for us in so many ways. And, when consumed in moderation, chamomile tea is generally considered safe for most healthy adults. 

If chamomile tea is new to you, introduce this herbal tea to your diet slowly. Drinking high amounts of strong chamomile tea in a short period of time has been known to cause upset stomach, nausea, or even vomiting, so be mindful and use common sense when adding chamomile tea to your day. 

To make flavorful, calming chamomile tea, the leaves and flowers of the chamomile plant are steeped in boiled water. Visit our Chamomile Tea Recipes section for some tips for making perfect chamomile tea (hot, iced, or for a lovely chamomile tea bath, facial steam, or hair rinse). 

If you have an allergy to any plant in the Asteraceae (Compositae) family (e.g. ragweed, echinacea, dandelions, arnica, sunflowers, chrysanthemums, feverfew, calendula, or asters), this could mean you may also have an allergic response to chamomile (whether consumed or used topically).  

Note also, with an allergy to chamomile, use of chamomile tea as an eye wash could potentially lead to allergic conjunctivitis (also known as 'pink eye').

Ask your trusted healthcare provider about possible chamomile tea side effects if you are being treated for any condition or taking any medication (such as sedatives or diabetes or blood-thinning medication), as chamomile may affect the effectiveness of these medications. In addition, please consult with your primary care provider about chamomile tea side effects if you are being treated for asthma, as this herbal tisane has been known to aggravate asthma.

If you're a regular chamomile tea drinker and you have a medical or dental surgery coming up, ask your healthcare professional if this tea (with its blood-thinning properties) should be excluded from your diet until following your surgery.

And, be careful with chamomile tea's mild sedative effects. After consuming this tea, take care to avoid any activity that may require your full and alert attention if you're feeling too relaxed or sleepy. 

Chamomile Tea for Moms and Tots

Chamomile Tea Side Effects | The Tea Talk

What about chamomile tea side effects if you're expecting or planning to fall pregnant? While some sources suggest that chamomile tea may help to relieve occasional sleeplessness, stress, poor digestion, or nausea during this time, other sources indicate that chamomile, as a uterine stimulant, should be avoided during pregnancy. 

Have a visit with your primary care provider about safe, beneficial tea choices during pregnancy and while breastfeeding, and you can also find some helpful information on the Bellybelly website about herbal teas during pregnancy

| Related:  Teas for Moms and Tots on Pinterest

What about chamomile tea for children and infants? Calming chamomile tea is a popular tea for children and may help to soothe nervous energy and alleviate mild upset stomach. Chamomile tea is also well-known for helping to relieve colic problems and, when used topically, diaper rash, but be sure to consult with your natural health physician about types and amounts of herbal teas that are best for the little ones in your household. 


In general, use good common sense when purchasing and consuming chamomile tea. Choose high-quality chamomile tea (organic, if possible) from a reliable source, so you'll know you're purchasing pure chamomile. Use clean, fresh water when making tea (learn more here about choosing best water for tea). Don't drink tea that is harmfully hot, and drink tea (any type) in moderation. Keep these few tips in mind, and then... enjoy your lovely, beneficial tea!

We are so fortunate to have these amazing beverages available to us. Delicious, fragrant, affordable, so very versatile, and incredibly beneficial, herbal teas are a wonderful gift to our taste buds and also to our physical, mental, and emotional well-being. For more about herbal tisanes, please visit our Herbal, Spice, and Fruit Teas Pinterest board

Which is your favorite herbal tea? We'd love to know! Drop by The Tea Talk on Facebook to share your tea stories and comments. 

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American Chemical Society. "Drinking Chamomile Tea May Help Fight Complications Of Diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080915164519.htm>.

Amsterdam JD, Li Y, Soeller I, et al. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral Matricaria recutita (chamomile) extract therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2009 Aug;29(4):378-82.

Amsterdam JD, Shults J, Soeller I, et al. Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) may provide antidepressant activity in anxious, depressed humans: an exploratory study. Altern Ther Health Med. 2012 Sep-Oct;18(5):44-9. 

Chamomile. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamomile. 

Charousaei F, Dabirian A, Mojab F. Using chamomile solution or a 1% topical hydrocortisone ointment in the management of peristomal skin lesions in colostomy patients: results of a controlled clinical study. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2011 May;57(5):28-36. 

Gladstar R. Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner’s Guide. North Adams, MA: Storey Publishing, 2012. 

Kato A, Minoshima Y, Yamamoto J, et al. Protective Effects of Dietary Chamomile Tea on Diabetic Complications. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2008;56(17),8206–8211. 

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McGill University. "Chamomile Tea And Lotion Causing Internal Bleeding In Patient On Anti-coagulant Medication." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 April 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060427161856.htm>.

Ogata-Ikeda I, Seo H, Kawanai T, et al. Cytotoxic action of bisabololoxide A of German chamomile on human leukemia K562 cells in combination with 5-fluorouracil. Phytomedicine. 2011 Mar 15;18(5):362-5. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2010.08.007. Epub 2010 Sep 21. 

Research on the Health Benefits of Chamomile. Retrieved from http://www.naturopathic-health.co.uk/chamomile-research.htm 

Singh O, Khanam Z, Misra N,  Srivastava MK. Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.): An overview. Pharmacogn Rev. 2011 Jan-Jun;5(9):82–95.

Srivastava JK, Gupta S. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of chamomile extract in various human cancer cells. J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Nov 14;55(23):9470-8. Epub 2007 Oct 17. 

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Srivastava JK, Pandey M, Gupta S. Chamomile, a novel and selective COX-2 inhibitor with anti-inflammatory activity. Life Sci. 2009 Nov 4;85(19-20):663-9. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2009.09.007. Epub 2009 Sep 27. 

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