More Black Tea Health Benefits

Black tea health benefits may be just what you need if you're longing for relief from a stressful day, want to show your heart and bones some love, or you're aiming to keep your teeth in good condition and your breath fresh. 

Black tea has been steeped and enjoyed by tea lovers for centuries, and its enticing aroma and satisfying taste are just the beginning - this beloved beverage provides myriad health benefits, too, helping to keep us strong and well. 

And, it's not only traditional herbal wisdom and anecdotal evidence that support black tea health benefits... Recent research about tea benefits also confirms the many ways black tea is good for us. 

This simple, uplifting beverage packs a powerful punch! 

Let's keep looking at black tea health benefits (if you missed the beginning of our Black Tea Benefits section, you'll find it here). 

Black Tea Health Benefits | The Tea Talk
  • Black tea is an effective stress buster. Black tea contains the amino acid "theanine," which can help us feel more relaxed and less stressed, without feeling drowsy or lethargic. So, if a hectic workday or nerve-racking event or task has left you feeling tense or frazzled, try sipping some black tea to bring your cortisol (aka the 'stress' hormone) levels back to normal more quickly. You'll feel better faster, plus, de-stressing more quickly can provide additional protection against other illness, like heart disease. (Coloring lovely tea art is another way that tea can help you feel calmer and more relaxed...)

| Related:  Herbal Teas for Anxiety

  • Promote bone density and strength with black tea. With age, we lose bone mass, and our bones become weaker and thinner. However, habitually drinking black, oolong, and/or green tea may boost bone strength and reduce the risk of a fracture as we age. Research has found that tea drinkers who have enjoyed tea regularly (at least once per week) for six or more years have higher overall BMD (bone mineral density) than those who don't normally drink tea. A long-term tea drinking habit - ten years or more - can lead to even greater bone strength. 
Black Tea Health Benefits | The Tea Talk
  • Boost mental focus, energy, and alertness with black tea. If you've just hit your mid-afternoon slump or have an important meeting, activity, or exam coming up, try a cup or two of black or green tea about 30 minutes beforehand to boost mental performance. Tea consumption is known to increase alertness, memory, decision-making skills, concentration, mental energy, and clarity of mind. This boost in cognitive function is provided by tea's beneficial components, including its naturally occurring caffeine. 

| Related:  Caffeine Benefits

You + Black Tea

We'd love to hear about your experience with black tea! Whether you love it for its taste or its wellness benefits, share your story here (and see what others are saying about this amazing brew, too)!

  • Drinking black (or green) tea may lower the risk of Parkinson's disease. Numerous studies have explored the effects of tea consumption on this degenerative neurological disorder, and results suggest that drinking 1 to 3 cups of black or green tea daily may significantly reduce the chance of developing Parkinson's disease. 
  • Support overall dental health with this tasty beverage. Sip some black tea regularly not only to freshen your breath, but also for protection against dental plaque, cavities, and tooth decay. Studies show that black, oolong, and green teas may hinder development and acid production of cavity-producing bacteria in our mouths. Black tea's antioxidants also work to hinder plaque build-up, leading to healthier teeth and fresher breath. Tea drinkers (as compared to those who turn to carbonated drinks or coffee) tend to have fewer cavities and better overall dental health - whether or not they add sugar to their tea. 

Be Safe - Black Tea Precautions

Black tea health benefits aside, it's important that we always stay informed about any precautions or potential risks or side effects in drinking tea (and anything else we put in or on our bodies).

For most healthy adults, drinking black tea in moderation (up to 3 or 4 cups per day) is considered safe. However, especially if you are expecting or nursing a little one, are being treated for any physical or mental condition or disease, or are taking any prescription or over-the-counter medications, have a chat with your trusted healthcare practitioner about safe amounts of black tea for you. 

Keep in mind, too, if you're sensitive to caffeine, you may want to watch your black tea consumption, as this tea does have caffeine. Wondering how much? You can learn more on our Caffeine Facts page

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You may be a black tea drinker simply because you love the soothing comfort of a hot mug of milky sweet black tea. Or, black tea may be one of your regulars because you rely on black tea health benefits as part of your overall wellness plan.

Whatever your reason for loving black tea, this rich, full-flavored tea will satisfy your taste buds and nurture your body and mind, as well.

Another Way to Enjoy Black Tea Health Benefits

A tea smoothie is another lovely way to include black tea health benefits in your day. Need some help getting started with tea smoothies? Try our Tea Smoothies book for some ideas, inspiration, and yummy recipes. 

Be sure to keep some black tea in your tea stash. It's perfect when you need a bit of comfort and want to do some good for your health, too. Interested in what our other readers have to say about black tea health benefits? Read more here. 

> > More Black Tea Benefits

Sources


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