More Benefits of Stinging Nettle Tea

The benefits of stinging nettle tea (also known as "common nettle" or simply "nettle") will tempt you to make this herbal tea a regular part of your tea-life. Nettle makes a fragrant, earthy-tasting tea that supports physical and emotional wellness in so many ways. 

Benefits of Stinging Nettle Tea | The Tea Talk

Whether you are struggling with aches and pains, long for relief from hay fever symptoms, are frustrated with thinning hair, have a digestive system that isn't working as you'd like, or just feel somewhat lackluster, this healthful herbal tisane may help.

You could sum up the benefits of stinging nettle tea simply by saying this herbal tea is an overall tonic for your body and mind... but let's look at more of the uniquely wonderful ways nettle tea is so very good for wellness. (If you'd rather start from the beginning, our Benefits of Stinging Nettle Tea section starts here.) 

  • Like many other teas, nettle tea is a great source of antioxidants. Antioxidant-rich foods and beverages are an essential part of a healthful diet - they help to keep us looking and feeling younger, reduce the risk of chronic disease, and boost immunity, mood, and memory. Brewing some nettle tea is a quick, easy, affordable, and oh-so-flavorful way to boost your antioxidant intake. 
  • Sluggish digestion? Sipping some nettle tea may help. Not only can this nourishing tea stimulate digestion, but it may also improve liver, gallbladder, and intestinal function; reduce stomach acids; and alleviate diarrhea or constipation. 

You + Nettle Tea

Have you experienced the benefits of nettle tea firsthand? We'd love to hear about it! Click here to share your nettle tea story, and see what others are saying about this lovely tea, too. 

  • Nettle tea supports our "waste removal" system, as well - nettle (especially the root of the plant) acts as a tonic and detoxifier for the kidneys and encourages regular urination. Nettle tea may aid in relieving bladder infections and UTIs (urinary tract infections), too. These effective diuretic properties can also benefit us in other ways, such as improving skin concerns (like rash, acne, and eczema), gout, edema, and arthritis. 
  • If you're struggling with frustrating water retention (during that time of the month, for example), try steeping and enjoying some nettle tea - its diuretic properties can support your body in getting rid of that excess fluid quickly and effectively. 
  • This herbal tea may be a good choice for the men in your life, too. Nettle root may lessen prostate enlargement and the urinary concerns that can accompany BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia), such as painful, reduced, incomplete, frequent, or more urgent urination. And, research suggests that stinging nettle root could potentially provide anti-cancer support for the prostate, too, by helping to slow or halt the spread of prostate cancer cells.   
Benefits of Stinging Nettle Tea | The Tea Talk
  • Show your blood some love with nettle tea. This beneficial tea is rich in essential iron, promotes healthy blood circulation, and builds and purifies the blood. Try drinking some nettle tea to build blood after blood loss (like your period). Its high iron content means nettle tea may be an effective support for iron-deficiency anemia, too. 
  • This herbal tea is also known for its ability to lessen bleeding. To ease long or heavy menstruation or reduce bleeding due to gingivitis or nosebleed, brewing and savoring some stinging nettle tea may help (a nettle tea compress may aid in stopping a nosebleed, too). 

Enjoy the benefits of stinging nettle tea and the nettle plant

The nettle plant has been appreciated for centuries for its health and wellness benefits, but did you know it's also enjoyed as a source of food in many cultures? Try cooking young, tender nettle leaves and stems and using them in dishes where you would use other cooked leafy greens, such as spinach or dandelion (in soups, stews, lasagna, as a side dish, and so on). And beneficial nettle tea makes a wonderful liquid base for nourishing soups and smoothies

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Now that you know more about the benefits of stinging nettle tea for health and wellbeing, you may be ready to steep a cup so you can begin to enjoy nettle tea's goodness for yourself. Drop by our Nettle Tea Recipes pages for some tips on making the perfect cup of nettle tea or some help with a nettle tea compress, bath, or hair rinse (if it's nettle tea's topical benefits you're interested in).

And, if nettle tea is a new herbal tea for you, you can learn more here about some precautions for nettle tea. 

> > More Nettle Tea Benefits

Sources


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Chrubasik JE, Roufogalis BD, Wagner H, Chrubasik SA. A comprehensive review on nettle effect and efficacy profiles, Part I: herba urticae. Phytomedicine. 2007 Jun;14(6):423-35. 

Ghorbanibirgani A, Khalili A, Zamani L. The Efficacy of Stinging Nettle (Urtica Dioica) in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Randomized Double-Blind Study in 100 Patients. Iran Red Crescent Med J. 2013 Jan; 15(1): 9–10.

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Hirano T, Homma M, and Oka K. Effects of stinging nettle root extracts and their steroidal components on the Na+,K(+)-ATPase of the benign prostatic hyperplasia. Planta Med 1994;60(1):30-33. 

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Johnson TA, Sohn J, Inman WD, Bjeldanes LF, Rayburn K. Lipophilic stinging nettle extracts possess potent anti-inflammatory activity, are not cytotoxic and may be superior to traditional tinctures for treating inflammatory disorders. Phytomedicine. 2013 Jan 15;20(2):143-7.

Kianbakht S, Khalighi-Sigaroodi F, Dabaghian FH. Improved glycemic control in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus taking Urtica dioica leaf extract: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Clin Lab. 2013;59(9-10):1071-6.

Klingelhoefer S, Obertreis B, Quast S, Behnke B. Antirheumatic effect of IDS 23, a stinging nettle leaf extract, on in vitro expression of T helper cytokines. J Rheumatol. 1999 Dec;26(12):2517-22.

Konrad L, Müller HH, Lenz C, Laubinger H, Aumüller G, Lichius JJ. Antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer cells by a stinging nettle root (Urtica dioica) extract. Planta Med. 2000 Feb;66(1):44-7.

Lichius JJ, Muth C. The inhibiting effects of Urtica dioica root extracts on experimentally induced prostatic hyperplasia in the mouse. Planta Med. 1997 Aug;63(4):307-10.

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Moradi HR, Erfani Majd N, Esmaeilzadeh S, Fatemi Tabatabaei SR. The histological and histometrical effects of Urtica dioica extract on rat’s prostate hyperplasia. Veterinary Research Forum. 2015;6(1):23-29.

Namazi N, Esfanjani AT, Heshmati J, Bahrami A. The effect of hydro alcoholic Nettle (Urtica dioica) extracts on insulin sensitivity and some inflammatory indicators in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind control trial. Pak J Biol Sci. 2011 Aug 1;14(15):775-9.

Namazi N, Tarighat A, Bahrami A. The effect of hydro alcoholic nettle (Urtica dioica) extract on oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Pak.J.Biol.Sci. 1-15-2012;15(2):98-102.

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