A Delicious, Healthy Dandelion Tea Recipe

Welcome to our Dandelion Tea Recipe pages, where you'll find tips for making dandelion tea (hot or iced) from loose dandelion tea, teabags, or dandelion leaves or roots you've harvested yourself.

Dandelion tea is a naturally caffeine-free herbal tea made from any combination of the leaves, flowers, and roots of the dandelion plant. 

This hardy, colorful little plant (although considered by many to be a bothersome weed) is actually bursting with vitamins and minerals, and provides a host of other health and wellness benefits, too. 

While dandelion tea does have a somewhat bitter taste, you may be surprised at how quickly the taste of this tea grows on you - especially once you've experienced how very good it helps you feel!

Dandelion Tea Recipe

Dandelion Tea Recipe

Dandelion tea, like other herbal teas, is delicious, healthful, and so quick and easy to make. When you're ready to enjoy some of this beneficial herbal tea, follow these simple steps for a tasty dandelion tea recipe.

You'll need...

  • 1 heaping teaspoon loose dandelion tea, 1 dandelion teabag, 1 heaping teaspoon dried dandelion leaves, or 2 - 3 heaping teaspoons fresh, thoroughly washed young dandelion leaves (add flowers and washed, chopped dandelion roots, too, if you'd like)
  • 8 oz. (about 250 ml) fresh, clean water, brought just to the boil
  • Optional additions to taste, such as lemon, mint, a cinnamon stick, or a bit of sweetener, like organic honey or maple syrup

To make the tea...

  1. Add the teabag or loose tea to your favorite cup or mug (an infuser cup or mug is so handy if you're using loose leaves).
  2. Cool the just-boiled water for a minute or two (herbal teas are tastiest when steeped in hot, rather than boiling water), and then add to your cup.
  3. Cover your delicious dandelion tea to hold in all of those beneficial properties, and let it steep for 3 to 10 minutes (longer steeping times tend to bring out the fullest benefits of herbal teas, but may make dandelion tea taste more bitter, too). 
  4. Then, remove the teabag or loose tea leaves (you can leave fresh dandelion leaves in your tea, if you'd like, because they're edible).
  5. Add extras to taste, like sweetener, lemon, or mint, if you wish. (Because dandelion tea has a tart flavor, many people prefer to add some honey or maple syrup or blend this tea with another herbal tea, like chamomile or peppermint.)
  6. Now... enjoy your tea and its many benefits for good health!

Remember, this dandelion tea recipe is just a guideline - you may find that you like your dandelion tea quite a bit stronger or weaker, so experiment with the ratio of tea leaves to water and the steeping time until you've created the perfect cup of tea for you.

This dandelion tea recipe increases very well, so why not invite a girlfriend or your mom over to share a big pot of healthful dandelion tea and a cozy chat? Simply increase the proportions given above to suit your favorite teapot, and remember to add an extra teaspoon of loose tea 'for the pot.'

And, because dandelion is edible, if you've made your tea from dandelion leaves you've picked yourself, you can leave them in the tea, rather than straining them out, if you'd like.

Using your own dandelions for tea

If your lawn is kindly providing you with lots of dandelions, you won't need to turn to store-bought dandelion tea - you can use your own dandelions for tea!

Very important, though - make sure you're only using clean dandelions that haven't been treated with any sort of toxic chemicals (like pesticides or insecticides). Avoid dandelions from areas that may have been visited by pets, too!

If you're interested in making dandelion tea using just the roots of the dandelion plant, you'll find a recipe for Dandelion Root Tea here.

Dandelion Iced Tea

A general rule for making iced tea is to double the amount of loose tea or the number of teabags you would typically use for hot tea. This way, you'll still have a very flavorful, fragrant glass or jug of tea when the beverage is chilled and ice is added. 

If you'd rather enjoy your dandelion tea iced, simply follow the recipe given above, but use about double the amount of loose tea, teabags, or dandelion leaves. Then, let your tea cool to room temperature, pop it in the fridge, and serve over ice once it's chilled. Or, if you can't wait, pour over ice and drink up right away!

You'll find more tips for making the best iced tea here.

Dandelion Tea Recipe

Keep reading to find recipes for dandelion tea made just from dandelion roots, as well as a Dandelion Tea Spa Bath

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It's amazing that this unassuming little plant is a wonderful gift, filled with so many benefits for physical and mental health and wellness! (You can read more about the many benefits of dandelion tea here.)

Please remember, as with any new tea, be sure to check into any potential risks or side effects of that tea for you and your family. Drop by our Dandelion Tea Side Effects page to learn more.

Rather than trying to eradicate dandelions from your yard, why not enjoy what they have to offer... such a cheerful, pretty, colorful face; a healthier yard; and a wonderful, healthful addition to your (and your family's) diet!

Why not try...

More about Dandelion Tea Benefits

Benefits of Dandelion Tea - Tart, tasty dandelion tea is bursting with flavor and is also wonderfully beneficial for physical and mental health and wellness. 

Your Dandelion Tea Benefits! - If you're a fan of dandelion tea and its benefits for good health and wellness, why not share your thoughts and opinions with our other readers? And, see what other visitors to our site have to say about dandelion tea benefits, too.

Dandelion Tea Recipes - Drop by our Dandelion Tea Recipe pages for tips on making hot or iced dandelion tea from loose dandelion tea, teabags, or dandelion leaves or roots you've harvested yourself. Why not treat yourself to a spa-like dandelion tea bath, too?

Dandelion Tea Side Effects - Before adding dandelion tea to your daily routine, read more about some potential risks and side effects associated with this herbal tea.

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